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Painting with Industrial Enamel

Posted By ScottM Sunday, August 21, 2011 6:56 AM
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David M. Holt
 Posted Wednesday, August 24, 2011 2:30 PM
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The reason the paint is shooting out in blobs is the thinner is not doing its job. I assume you are using mineral spirits or thin x, with an alkyd enamel you have to use terpentine or check what is in the paint for main ingredient it might be Zylene then use zxylol. Use can get it any house paint store. It will thin down perfect for spraying. You're first  coat will have to be thin so it won't run. let solvent flash out between coats and it will keep the high shine.
ScottM
 Posted Wednesday, August 24, 2011 10:21 AM
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So I popped into the paint supplier that sold me the paint today and asked a few questions.  I am using Devoe Devguard 4308 Industrial Enamel - it is an alkylid, single stage paint.  I was told that I do not need a hardener, although I could add one, from his experiences the hardener doesn't make much of a difference.  Total curing time is somewhere around 7-10 days, depending on temperature, humidity and the alignment of the moon and sun.  When it comes to thinning this stuff, you aren't supposed to thin it, but it can be thinned up to 25%. The paint tech mentioned that my biggest problem is my gun, which is a siphon feed canister.  After a brief explanation of how the gun works, I was told that if 'blobs' are shot out of the gun even after thinning, I am not getting proper atomization.  The real reason for this is the number of air ports on the wings of the gun, my gun has one on either wing, but I might need two or possibly three ports on each to allow enough air to flow into the paint stream while maintaining a low air pressure through the gun.  Sounds simple, thin it, if all else fails buy a new nozzle for the gun...

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beemergary
 Posted Sunday, August 21, 2011 3:16 PM
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I ve always had better luck using more reducer that is said too. If the enamel has metallics in it I won't use it when I plan on wet sanding and wheeling out for a show finish. The metallics get messed up and burnt. Just Me Talkin
David M. Holt
 Posted Sunday, August 21, 2011 2:49 PM
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You should mix it 10% thinner 90% paint just stay back 10 to 12 inches to let the solvent disperse into the air not on the piece you're painting. Let flash between coats 10 to 15 minutes and it shouldn't look hazy when its dry.
ScottM
 Posted Sunday, August 21, 2011 11:37 AM
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Just came in from spraying a small part or two - can said no thinning required, so I dumped it in and shot some paint.  It worked OK, but there is a lot of orange peel, not a big deal, just means some sanding to smooth it out before I re-coat.  I guess I need to thin the paint a bit...

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resto_1
 Posted Sunday, August 21, 2011 8:26 AM
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I have used Rustolem oil based enamel on restorred garden tractors garden several tractors. (but not on the truck yet) Mixed it 6 parts paint, 2 parts medium enamel reducer, and 1/2 part hardener.  Good high gloss durable finish.  Shot it with a small gravity gun, about 10-15 psi at the tip, about 65 degrees temerature.  Had good luck with it holding up so far, but I only stated using that 3 years ago.  It's a whole lot cheaper then automotive finishes.  I would recommend shooting something as a test piece first to see how you like it before painting something as important as the dash.  I haven't used fish-eye preventer, but haven't had a problem either.
dieselsmoke
 Posted Sunday, August 21, 2011 7:28 AM
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What kind of paint are you spraying? It should have a mixing ratio on the can somewhere. Try just a  splash of reducer/thinner and see how it sprays, add accordingly. The more thinner added the LESS gloss you will have when it drys. If you want more gloss add a hardener. They make a universal enamel hardner but I can't remember the name. Hope this helps.

Fred Kuhn, St.albans, VT.
1974 Peterbilt 359 Detroit 12v71n @475 13spd

1972 Ford F250 4x2 390 4spd

1994 Ford F350 4x4 IH 7.3 Turbo 5spd
Sunday, August 21, 2011 7:29 AM by dieselsmoke
ScottM
 Posted Sunday, August 21, 2011 6:56 AM
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So I have a gravity feed spray gun and am ready to lay some paint on the dash of my truck.  I am wondering, do I need to thin industrial enamel to spray it?  I have heard that the amount of thinner used increases the glossiness of the spray job - which isn't a big deal, just means that I need to ensure my mix is consistent...

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