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Biederman trucks

Posted By mandator Tuesday, November 22, 2011 2:08 PM
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MP&C
 Posted Monday, July 04, 2016 6:38 AM
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...and now for the battery tray, shown here, 14 gauge cold rolled, cut to size and sides folded up...








For the end folds, the cut was started using a .035 cutoff wheel..





...and our trusty jig saw again...














Both ends complete, and frame holes have been piloted. Once checked to the hole spacing on the frame they can be drilled out for the 3/8 bolts.










Not a perfect factory replacement, but highly functional.
Monday, July 04, 2016 6:40 AM by MP&C
MP&C
 Posted Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:54 AM
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John, one other thing I noticed was the Factory literature installed the running boards backwards. :D




jovan
 Posted Saturday, July 02, 2016 2:46 AM
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Thanks to Robert we are in the final stretch. The wiring harness has been fabricated and installed. The gas tank needs to be sealed and installed in preparation for starting the engine. I made a trip to Restoration Specialties in PA this week to pick up the final items to trim out the cab. We have to fabricate new filler panels to go between the running boards and cab. The originals are trash. I finally got the folding windshields apart, repaired and restored. I'll soon be on the hunt for a dump body to finish the project.
MP&C
 Posted Friday, July 01, 2016 2:49 PM
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John's getting ready for engine start ceremonies, so I guess I need to get off my duff here. To help out in that regard, next we'll fabricate the battery tray which I don't believe came with the truck when John got it. Here's the best we have for a pattern:









The hold down bracket for the prescribed Group 4 battery was with the truck, so we did some test fitting with the inner fender in place. It is a bit cramped for space, and John expressed concern of the availability of the Group 4 battery. Most local sources only carry the Group 1 in stock, which would also be a better fit.. So out with the old...









I did miss getting in the flat pictures, but here is the freshly folded and welded hold down bracket for the new battery size.














All trimmed and prepped for paint..














Comparing the new to the old...









Next will be the new battery tray.
MP&C
 Posted Monday, March 14, 2016 6:57 AM
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Not my video, but here is one that shows the Erco 1447 shrinker in action, use the shrink on a flange of an angle and it will give you a curve along that angle.. For shrinking the two outside legs of a u channel you would need the dies shown in this video that protrude outward from the machine to accommodate that flange without interference.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3a8-8OX6Hs







To show how tight of a radius they are capable of, here are some test samples I did after I first got the Erco:








These samples were using 18 ga cold rolled steel, about a 4" long piece with 1" flanges. The first result shown is after about 4 passes on the stretching jaws, with a close up to show the "finish" result.











Shown against a roll of tape to compare the radius size we've accomplished..





Here's a closer shot to show the stippling on the shrinker jaw....





.....and the shrinking sample....











These Lancasters are what it replaced....










Warning, these are not cheap, and if you only need a couple shrinks done on a one time basis, find someone who has one. These sell in the 4 figure range, price dependent on quality and type of dies included.
Monday, March 14, 2016 7:13 AM by MP&C
Bruce Ohnstad
 Posted Monday, March 14, 2016 5:59 AM
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Great work, MP&C,

What is the kick in "kick shrinker"? I have heard of planishing hammers that can shrink metal, but I have a hard time understanding how it works. Do these shrinking techniques raise ripples that take up area?

I'm needing to curve some sheet metal U channels with the web on the outside diameter. If I can shrink the flange edges it would bend the channel. I'm thinking of buying a planishing hammer but I'll need some advice.

Bruce


1932 White 643 restored in the working museum
MP&C
 Posted Saturday, March 12, 2016 2:05 PM
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Today we got the second inner fender cut out, and took them both over for a test fit on the truck








The driver's side has a bolting plate in the middle of the frame for the steering box, so a relief notch was in order... This didn't show on the original as that part had long rusted off..





....as well as a bit of trimming for some clearance so that the paint won't be chipped off on the first test drive. The fabrication of these parts are done, and we should pick up the new Tommasini Wheeling Machine this coming weekend so we can get started on the fender patches..








roKWiz
 Posted Friday, March 11, 2016 12:37 PM
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Nice work your doing.

www.stonemasoncarver.com/Kenworthrestoration

In order that the labour of centuries past may not be in vain during the centuries to come...............Denis Diderot 1752

Cam
 Posted Friday, March 11, 2016 7:38 AM
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Wonderful work. But time consuming. Years ago I sold an NOS set of LT Mack fenders for something like $3,000 or $3,500. All the hours of work that go into resurrecting a used set of fenders certainly helps explain that price. And even those fenders needed fitting to the truck and work around the edges to be perfect.
Friday, March 11, 2016 7:39 AM by Cam
MP&C
 Posted Thursday, March 10, 2016 3:15 PM
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Tonight in the shop we started work on John's front fenders for the 1947 Biederman Truck, seen here for reference:



The fenders are made using 16 gauge steel, so this may be a bit challenging when we get to blocking and wheeling patches for the fenders themselves. In the meantime (while still waiting for the new English wheel) let's get started on the inner fenders. The driver's side is the worst, with so much rotted away that we couldn't get accurate dimensions. The passenger side was in much better condition, but just shy of 70 years has taken its toll in adding some wavy distortion. So we'll remake both sides for a better match.



In order to get a more crisp bend on the 16 gauge steel, we used a tipping die in the Lennox to thin the metal at the line of the bend.







Bending in the Baileigh Magnetic Brake..









This detail shot shows how the thinning helps get a tighter bend..



Next, we needed a profile template for the rear radius, so the kick shrinker is used on a folded 19 gauge strip to add the radius..





A flat folded strip works better than an angle as if you shrink too far in this direction.....



......you can simply shrink the back half to reverse the effect without the need for changing to the stretching die..



Now with an accurate pattern, we can use the template on the new inner fender..





All trimmed...





With the new clamped to the old, we can see what the years of abuse has done..



One down, one to go..

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