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1937 Coleman 11.00 24" tires


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By modifier - Saturday, December 28, 2019 9:36 AM
Hi. I just bought a 37 Coleman 4x4 and I'd like to find some traction lugged tires for it. 7 of them ideally.

The size is 11.00 24 and 46" OD 11-11.5" wide. The 24" rims are 7-7.5" wide and flat with no drop centers.

I could possibly go with a 12.00 24.

I've heard the issue is that most tires are designed for a drop center and have a taper to the bead, so they are less than 24" at the edge and will not go on a flat rim. Some people have ground away that tapered edge but that is reported to be a hard long task and very messy.

A grader tire would be nice. It only goes 25mph tops so I'm not worried about highway worthy.

I thought of trying some 24.5s to see if those would fit on, but finding those with a proper looking deep lug tread is not likely.

Anybody have any ideas?

Thanks
By Geoff Weeks - Saturday, December 28, 2019 11:33 AM
I don't know where you are getting your info, but a 24" tire is designed for a flat based rim. They will be tube types. Whatever you do, don't mount 24.5" tires, that is a good way to get killed. The bead will not retain the lock ring in the groove.
24" rubber is not common (in this country) but is still made.
By Bruce Ohnstad - Saturday, December 28, 2019 4:15 PM
I can't open your picture, but are your wheels disc or cast spoke?

Talk to people that know old time tube tires, and distinguish from the sizes for tubeless tires. The rubber needs it specific rim but the tubeless rims were drop center that would fit the older cast spoke wheels. The tubeless 24.5 translates to a 22" tube type wheel diameter.

Old Cat graders and others with tandem rears used heavy ply 10.00, 11.00, 12.00 24s and they might be available. Other early construction tires wider than 12 inches had a drop rim for some axle hubs. These wide tires might also be found on Oshkosh and FWD trucks of your vintage. Check out what those trucks use.

11.00:24 tube tires for trucks are made by Kumho from S. Korea. 12.00:24 seem to be more available, there are a lot of east coast heavy trucks with 12.00 tires so there might be more manufacturers available.

Bruce
By Geoff Weeks - Sunday, December 29, 2019 2:08 AM
I saw even Michelin list a few 12.00x 24 but those need a wider rim, 8.5 or at least an 8.0 rim. His truck has Coleman axles, most of which took a demountable rim and not a wheel but on the picture he posted I couldn't tell for sure what was used.
By Bruce Ohnstad - Sunday, December 29, 2019 5:15 PM
Yes, the 11 and 12 inch tube type tires should have a 8 inch wide rim, measured inside the two bead rings. They can be crammed on a narrower rim like a 7 inch. Some 12 inch tires I have have stamped on them "use 9" rims" but they are on 8" rims.

If you measure the rim width from the outside, subtract an inch or so. The measurements are imprecise but get you an idea.

Bruce
By modifier - Tuesday, December 31, 2019 3:06 PM
Geoff Weeks (12/28/2019)
I don't know where you are getting your info, but a 24" tire is designed for a flat based rim. They will be tube types. Whatever you do, don't mount 24.5" tires, that is a good way to get killed. The bead will not retain the lock ring in the groove.
24" rubber is not common (in this country) but is still made.


I'm getting the info from the guy whom I bought the truck from, whom I believe is also the president of the Coleman Club or something like that, has other Colemans. He said he had to grind away the taper on the 24" grader tires he found to fit on his rims. We'll see if this jpg loads.
By modifier - Tuesday, December 31, 2019 3:10 PM
Bruce Ohnstad (12/28/2019)
I can't open your picture, but are your wheels disc or cast spoke?

Talk to people that know old time tube tires, and distinguish from the sizes for tubeless tires. The rubber needs it specific rim but the tubeless rims were drop center that would fit the older cast spoke wheels. The tubeless 24.5 translates to a 22" tube type wheel diameter.

Old Cat graders and others with tandem rears used heavy ply 10.00, 11.00, 12.00 24s and they might be available. Other early construction tires wider than 12 inches had a drop rim for some axle hubs. These wide tires might also be found on Oshkosh and FWD trucks of your vintage. Check out what those trucks use.

11.00:24 tube tires for trucks are made by Kumho from S. Korea. 12.00:24 seem to be more available, there are a lot of east coast heavy trucks with 12.00 tires so there might be more manufacturers available.

Bruce
By modifier - Tuesday, December 31, 2019 3:12 PM
Here is the truck. If the photo loads this time.

3 tries and the main photo won't show up.

I have never seen the truck in person. It still needs to be hauled home.
By Geoff Weeks - Wednesday, January 01, 2020 2:52 AM
I can't speak to off-road tires, but those rims will take a std 24" ( 11x24) tire for trucks, they are the std flat based tube type rim. They have a 5 deg bead seat.
By modifier - Thursday, January 02, 2020 4:29 PM
Geoff Weeks (1/1/2020)
I can't speak to off-road tires, but those rims will take a std 24" ( 11x24) tire for trucks, they are the std flat based tube type rim. They have a 5 deg bead seat.


OK. I was just going by what the seller, who appears very knowledgeable and experienced told me.
By Tim Elder - Thursday, February 27, 2020 12:55 PM
Lots of older fire apparatus used the 24" tire; one of mine was originally 40 x 8. There are sources, but I don't know about that width and traction lugs.
By Bruce Ohnstad - Friday, February 28, 2020 3:18 AM
Funny, today I clicked those picture links and two worked, two did not.

But I saw the restored chassis from rear. Second photo that worked was the before restoration from the front left side. Your truck looks good. The tires look fine, if it is not driven far and fast.

Do those tires have stamped "Nylon" or "Rayon"? If it is nylon then they will be at earliest from the late 1950s and fairly stable. Rayon was from the late 1930s and held up better than cotton, but will degrade and it's another 20 year older rubber. Rayon would be for display only.

I got a 1932 heavy truck from California that has tires probably from the late 1930s to 1940s, judging from the tread design and truck work history. It has 12.00:24 cast spoke wheels, Dayton style rims. Four tires are Kelley Springfield, General, and maybe another brand. They are cotton chord, diamond tread or highway tread and 3 still hold air. Several are big letter stamped "Balloon" which meant our "modern" air pressure of 70-80 psi. That tire design came out in the late 1920s and were called "balloon" and "low pressure" tires in the early years to contrast with skinny "high pressure" pneumatics.

The truck was lengthened to carry a crane. The inside duals are Firestone slanted wide-bar tread, and large print "Excavator" stamped on the sidewall. The Excavator tires were not squatting and I couldn't reach its valve stem, so I never checked air pressure in those heavy tires. None of these tires have a "Ply Rating" number stamped, just the brand, tire size, but they do have stamped: "Use 9 inch rims" I measured the rims and they measure about 8 1/2 to 9 inches on the OUTSIDE, so those Excavator tires are squeezed onto 8" rims.

Your front tires look like some I have, 11.00:24 ML. ML means Mining and Logging. For the same number the dimensions are about 1-2 inches larger diameter and an inch and half wider than a highway tire.

Can you write down what is stamped on your existing tires?

Bruce

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